Welcome to Vedanta Shastras Library!

Spiritual Books and other writings related to Sanatana Dharma [Bhagavad Gita, Brahma-Sutra, 108+ Upanishads, Vedas, Vedic Hymns, Stotras of Adi Sankara, Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna, Gospel of Holy Mother, Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda, J. Krishnamurti Books, I am That of Nisargadatta Maharaj, 650+ Other Stotras, 450+ Vedanta Lessons and 550+ Carnatic Music Kritis] are here at Vedanta Shastras Library to inspire us.

This Vedanta Shastras Library is an Abridged Version of our Vedanta Spiritual Library.

Celextel has created this Vedanta Shastras Library with a noble intention of making these Indian Spiritual Treasures available to one and all. Please refer to the published books for the original text and commentary.

"The three basic texts of Vedanta are the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita and the Brahma Sutra. Together they are referred to as the Prasthana-traya, triple canon of Vedanta. The Upanishads constitute the revealed texts (sruti-prasthana); they mark the summits of the Veda which is Sruti (the heard, the revealed). They are the pristine springs of Vedantic metaphysics; Vedanta is the name given to them because they are the end (aim as well as concluding parts) of the Veda (Veda + anta). The Bhagavad-Gita comes next only to the Upanishads. It is given a status which is almost equal to that of the Upanishads. As embodying the teachings of Sri Krishna and as constituting the cream of the Epic Mahabharata, the Bhagavad Gita occupies a unique place in the Vedantic tradition. A popular verse compares the Upanishads to the cows, the Bhagavad-Gita to the milk, Sri Krishna to the milkman, Arjuna, the Pandava hero, to the calf and the wise people to the partakers of the milk. Sri Sankara describes the Bhagavad-Gita as the quintessence of the teaching of the entire Veda (samasta vedartha sarasangraha bhutam). As this text forms a part of the Mahabharata which is a Smriti (the remembered, ie., secondary text based on the Veda), it is called Smriti-prasthana. The third of the canonical texts is the Brahma Sutra which is regarded as Nyaya-prasthana, because it sets forth the teachings of Vedanta in a logical order. This work is known by other names also: Vedanta sutra, since it is the aphoristic text on Vedanta; Sariraka sutra, since it is concerned with the nature and destiny of the embodied soul; Bhikshu-Sutra, since those who are most competent to study it are the sannyasins; Uttara Mimamsa Sutra, since it is an inquiry into the final sections of the Veda. The author of the Brahma Sutra is Badarayana whom Indian tradition identifies with Vyasa, the arranger or compiler of Veda." [TMP Mahadevan - Foreward to Brahma-Sutra published by Advaita Ashram, Kolkatta].

"Truth is one; only It is called by different names. All people are seeking the same Truth; the variance is due to climate, temperament, and name. A lake has many ghats. From one ghat the Hindus take water in jars and call it 'jal'. From another ghat the Mussalmans take water in leather bags and call it 'paani'. From a third the Christians take the same thing and call it 'water'. Suppose someone says that the thing is not 'jal' but 'paani', or that it is not 'paani' but 'water', or that it is not 'water' but 'jal', It would indeed be ridiculous. But this very thing is at the root of the friction among sects, their misunderstandings and quarrels. This is why people injure and kill one another, and shed blood, in the name of religion. But this is not good. Everyone is going toward God. They will all realize Him if they have sincerity and longing of heart." [Sri Ramakrishna]

"Each soul is potentially divine. The goal is to manifest this Divinity within, by controlling nature, external and internal. Do this either by work, or worship, or psychic control, or philosophy - by one or more or all of these - and be free. This is the whole of religion. Doctrines, or dogmas, or rituals, or books, or temples, or forms, are but secondary details." [Swami Vivekananda]